Canvas House by Ministry of Design + Figment

A layer of white reveals the past and provides a canvas for the future

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Appreciation towards Ministry of Design + Figment for providing the following description:

像⽂物保护店屋这样的历史⺠居是记忆的宝库,拥有着⾃⼰的前世过往。MOD 通过在布莱路的Canvas公寓分层概念来探索历史以及我们与过去、现在和未来的关系,模糊了空间和物体之间的界限。

▼住宅外观,
the facade of the house ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

Historic dwellings like conservation shophouses are repositories of memories, with previous lives and a past of their own. Ministry of Design explores history and our relationship with the past, present and future through the concept of layers in Canvas House at Blair Road.

▼住宅入口,
the entrance of the house ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

MOD 在概念上⽤⼀层⽩⾊覆盖了过去,并为未来提供了⼀块画布。这栋房屋有节奏地展⽰了它的部分历史,有⽼⽊材的影⼦,也有⼀层层暴露在外的红砖和复杂的旧家具细节。

Blurring the boundaries between space and object, MOD conceptually blanketed Canvas House with a layer of white that provides a canvas for the future, whilst revealing historical preservation in concentrated spots. The house rhythmically reveals parts of its past, with Shadows of old timber as well as Layers of revealed brick and intricate details of re-purposed and upcycled furniture.

▼起居室和餐厅,用一层白色覆盖了过去,
the living room and the dining room, blanketing the house with a layer of white that reveals historical preservation in concentrated spots ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼起居室和餐厅,有节奏地展⽰了部分历史,
the living room and the dining room, the house rhythmically reveals parts of its past ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼餐厅,部分红砖暴露在外(左),餐厅与起居室的分隔(右),
the living room with Layers of revealed brick (left), the separation between the dining room and the living room (right) ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼起居室,
the living room ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼首层起居空间俯视,
top view of the living space on the first floor ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼室内的白色楼梯,
the interior stairs in the white tone ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼二层起居室,
the living room on the second floor ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼ALABASTER卧室套房的起居区,
the living area of the ALABASTER suite ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼ALABASTER卧室套房的就寝区,
the sleeping area of the ALABASTER suite ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼ALPINE卧室套房,
the ALPINE suite ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

与此同时,MOD 邀请游客想象⼀个充满梦想的未来,基于⼯作室创造的⼀幅霓虹灯⽂字作品,其中引⽤了 Thomas Jefferson 的⼀句话,概括了 MOD 对 Canvas House 的处理⽅法。这句话总结了这栋⽼房⼦的态度;Colin 解释说:“这是⼀块可以⽤来梦想未来的⽩⾊中性画布,⽽不是对过去的⼤规模效忠。

At the same time, MOD invites visitors to imagine a future with Dream, a text-based neon piece that the studio created, with a quote by Thomas Jefferson that encapsulates MOD’s approach to Canvas House. The quote summarizes the attitude of the house; Colin explains, “it is a neutral white canvas for the future to be dreamt upon, rather than a wholesale homage to the past.”

▼住宅内镜面细节,
mirror closeup details ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼室内餐具细节,
tableware details ©Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

▼平面布置图,layout plans ©Ministry of Design

 

DESIGN CONCEPT, PENNED BY COLIN SEAH, FOUNDER-DIRECTOR, MINISTRY OF DESIGN

1. The Brief and how MOD answered it

MOD has newly completed an all-white Canvas House for co-living, set in a heritage shophouse in Singapore along Blair Road. The developer (Figment) gave us a fixed budget and 4 months (design, sourcing & fitout) to reimagine the interiors, with the aim of renting out the suites to expats for 3-12 month stays. Rentals start from S$3300 a month. The brief was to do something absolutely appealing to long-stay renters, and a way for this co-living shophouse to stand out.

Faced with a tight budget and a tight timeline, alongside the desire for an overarching concept to underpin the moves, Colin and his team conceptualised the “Canvas House”:

a. Painting the entire house in white, to provide a canvas for the future, MOD decided to focus on “upcycling” to meet both constraints.
b. Majority of the tables, chairs, chests, mirrors, screens and vanity desks, were repurposed and given a new lease of life.
c. To pay homage to the past, yet give it character for the future, MOD painted these pieces all white but carved out “playful peek-a-boo reveals” of vignettes on the decorative dragon or longevity vases, ceramic plates hung on the wall, and wooden screens, vanity dressers and chairs.

Not only is this highly sustainable in terms of upcycling, it is also budget friendly, time-constraint friendly, and conceptually striking.

2. “I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past”

Blurring the boundaries between space and object, MOD conceptually blanketed Canvas House with a layer of white that provides a canvas for the future, whilst revealing historical preservation in concentrated spots.

Colin explains, “When it comes to adaptive reuse projects, the question is always the same, how do we tread the line between the past and the present? If one opts for the project to be just about preservation, it’s as good as time standing still… which could be paralysing and inhibiting. But at the same time, neither do we want to disregard history completely by creating something too foreign or novel. Our response was to layer over the existing history with a proverbial blank canvas whilst leaving choreographed glimpses into the past, blanketing both space and the furniture in it – allowing us to blur the inherent boundaries between past and present, object and space.”

To present this spatially, MOD created a text-based neon art piece, featuring a quote by Thomas Jefferson that encapsulates MOD’s approach to Canvas House. The quote summarizes the attitude of the house, quoting Colin, “it is a neutral white canvas for the future to be dreamt upon, rather than a wholesale homage to the past.” Fabricated by The Signmakers, the quote is penned in a single-stroke white and red glass neon, and encased in an aluminum box measuring 1.4m x 2.2m x 0.1m.

3. Blurring the boundaries

In a sense, the white blurs the distinction between new and old; it also blurs the distinction between the spatial elements (e.g. walls, ceiling), and the objects that sit within it (e.g. the furniture and lights). With everything white, object/space dichotomy is blurred. The house becomes more whole rather than a space populated by objects and people that move in and out. That allows the people using the space, to truly activate the space, and be the prominent features instead of merely inhabiting space.

4. Layers and Shadows

Parts of the past are rhythmically revealed throughout the space, with Layers of revealed brick and intricate details of pre-owned furniture, and Shadows of old timber. This technique is applied to a variety of places, including round timber reveals on the stairs throughout the four-storey house, and playful peek-a-boo reveals of vignettes on decorative dragon or longevity vases, vintage ceramic plates hung on the wall, and wooden screens, vanity dressers and chairs.

Historic details are preserved in a similarly conceptual fashion, where brick walls are revealed in concentrated circles. In the suites in particular, visitors will see “time shadows” cast by the beds, which reveals the underlay of the floor. Working with our builder, we marked out the outline of the afternoon-sun shadow and had the painter paint around this outline, allowing the mark of time to cast its mark on the ground.

5. Collaborating with artist Kang to design custom lights

MOD collaborated with Kang, an artist who specializes in upcycling and working with fused plastic to craft fashion accessories, to produce his first series of lights. Part of MOD’s incubation programme, Kang works from the MOD office to craft his materials. MOD collaborated with Kang to create 3 sets of luminaires with fused plastic made from cling film, placed at the five-foot-way, the living and the atrium areas. Keeping to the theme of layers, the cling film was layered and then ironed and heated to create a waterproof, leathery material.

 

时间:建成 2020
地址:新加坡
面积:350 平⽶

Time: Built 2020
Location: Singapore
Area: 350 sqm
Designer: Ministry of Design – Colin Seah, Kornpetch Chotipatoomwan (Nong), Yupadee Suvisith (Fai), Justin Lu, Zhang Hang
Developer: Figment – Fang Low, Gan Inn Siang
Painting: Reimage (furniture, artifacts, art), Ong Nga Renovation (walls, stairs)
General Contractor: Forte Resources
Electrician: Logic Engineering
Photography: Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography

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